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VIBE is doing way more than ruffling feathers and spilling the tea these days as a newly released article highlighting a different kind of culture for it’s African American readers.

Famed writer Aliya S. King journeyed to Atlanta’s esteemed Morehouse College to profile members of a sub-culture found within the institution’s often highly publicized and openly gay student body. The story took a closer look at the college’s dress code, which recently imposed over a year ago. The dress code was immediately said to be anti-gay because of its clause on banning of clothing usually worn by women, but some say that theory isn’t directly related to the gay community on campus.

The dress code also included restrictions on jeans at major programs in addition to sagging pants, do-rags and sunglasses. But do those separate apparel items easily identify cross-dressers or the gay student body as much as heels and handbags do?

Maybe one of the students, Diamond Martin Poulin, 20, has a bit more to say in his interview also highlighted in VIBE‘s complete story “The Mean Girls at Morehouse College.”

READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE: “The Mean Girls at Morehouse College”

Known for producing leaders in politics, community service and medicine, Morehouse College has long been viewed as the ultimate HBCU for young Black men, but has that prestigious account been tarnished or degraded in any way?

Now there are discussions and blogs popping up everywhere in response to this featured article as well what exactly the “Morehouse Man” is or should be.

Even the president of the college, Robert M. Franklin, also a graduate of Morehouse College, has spoken up and given his two cents (or more) on how he feels about the way the story was written and how it focuses on a “narrow perspective” deemed highly offensive to the iconic HBCU.

READ ROBERT M. FRANKLIN’S RESPONSE

So far the controversy says a great deal about where African Americans are still when it comes to handling, understanding and personifying homosexuality. Before we get into what it means for blacks and today’s generation, let’s take it to the streets and hear what people around are already saying nationally.

Do you have anything to add or say about the controversy? Should the article have been written? Should it have been refocused? Where do you stand with homosexuality in your community? Post your responses on the message board below and let’s get the social circle started.

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